Author: RampHead (page 1 of 9)

Ramp Bulbs For Sale Fall – 2018

Ramp bulbs are once again for sale. We will sell them for as long as the weather permits.

Pricing and payment buttons are on the Ramp Bulbs order page.

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Only A Few Bottles Of Ramp Seasoning Left

I don’t have many bottles of ramp seasoning left and once it is gone it will be gone until late next spring. If you’ve been holding off on buying some, I would suggest you buy it now as my stock has dwindled to only a few and it won’t last long.

Buy Ramp Seasoning Now

ramp seasoning

Ramp Seasoning Is Available For 2018

Hi everyone. Just a quick update to let you all know that ramp seasoning is available again. I currently have a limited quantity, so first come first serve. I will continue making more as time allows.

I hope everyone is doing well!

Buy Ramp Seasoning Now

ramp seasoning

Learning About Ramps

I’m New To Ramps. What Are They?

Ramps are nourishing harbingers of spring, breaking through lingering snow and ice. A foraged delicacy, their leaves, stalk and bulb are edible. They are sweetish with a slight pungency. A perennial wild onion with a pungent garlic odor with leek/onion flavor, it is found in Eastern North America from South Carolina to Canada. Also known as wild leek, wood leek, spring onion, wild garlic.

The plant has broad smooth light green 10” long leaves often with a hint of deep purple or burgundy on the lower stems. It has a scallion like stalk producing a flower and the bulb measures half an inch round. Plant leaves wither as the seed stalk develops, flowering in June-July. The preferred habitat is sandy, loamy moist soil under the woodlands canopy. Growing in dense colonies they can be found near streams and under trees. (Beech, Sugar Maple, Birch, Poplar, Hickory, Oak, Linden and Buckeye).

Raw or cooked in soups, pesto, accompanying egg dishes and sauteed with seasonal foraged wild greens, morels and April’s Shad harvest. After winter months with few fresh greens available this ingredient brings forth earthy flavors and revitalizes the palate. Thoreau referred to eating ramps as a “tonic of the wilderness.”

Ramps have been embraced by the Appalachian Mountain region. West Virginia is considered the heart of ramp country, where one will find numerous festivals celebrating the harvest.

What About That Name?

In Old English, the plant (although a slightly different one, since the ramp you’re likely to run into in the U.S. is a different species of wild leek) was a hramsa, which is similar to the word in Old German (ramese), which led to similar words in all the Scandinavian languages. And in Old English, when you wanted to pluralize some words, you didn’t add -s, you added -en. That formation isn’t productive anymore (nobody’s going around talking about “laptopen” and “iPaden”), but it’s how we got words like “oxen” and “children.” So hramsa turned into hramsen, which then led to the same plant being called both “rams” and “ramson,” with a double-plural “ramsons” thrown in sometimes for good measure.

Then, just for ease of pronunciation, people started popping a “p” in there, making “ramps.” This happens sometimes (we added an “n” to “passenger” and “messenger” from the French passager and messager, just because we felt like it), and probably just came from generations of little kids deciding that “ramps” was easier to say than “rams” (next up: spaghetti-pasketti). But, like “ramson” and “ramsons” before it, somewhere along the way we forgot that “rams” was actually the singular, and started calling a lonely “ramps” a “ramp.”

Interesting! Where Can I Buy Some?

Click Here To Go To The Order Page

 

Clump Of Ramps

Larger Ramps Are Now Available 4-9-2018

I know a lot of you guys are waiting for larger ramps and now is the time to order those. They have several inches of green leaves on them and will be growing quickly this week. If you want larger ramps and you order now, your order will be shipped on 4-16-2018.

Click Here To Go To The Order Page

Ramp Ribs

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 large pork rib rack
  • 1 pound of cleaned ramps
  • 2 two crushed garlic cloves
  • 3 finely chopped habanero peppers
  • 4 dashes balsamic vinegar
  • salt and pepper

DIRECTIONS

  • Rub the salt and pepper and garlic into both sides of the ribs.
  • Place the ribs curve up on some aluminum foil.
  • Place on the concave surfaced the ramps and sprinkle over with the hot peppers.
  • Give it several dashes of vinegar.
  • Wrap it up in foil and bake on the grill for 1 hour.
  • Carefully open the foil and mush what is left of the ramps and smear over the meat.
  • Place the meat on the grill and brown both sides.
  • Baste the meat with the juice ramp mixture left in the foil.
  • Just before removal coat well with your favorite barbecue sauce.
  • Forget the napkins everyone will want to lick their fingers.

Order your ramps here.

Breakfast Bowl with Ramps, Asparagus & Lemon Herb Sauce

A tasty and healthy breakfast all in one bowl!

Serves 4

4 thick slices of country style bread, cubed
12 stalks mini asparagus, cut in 3
12 ramps
4 tablespoons olive oil
salt and pepper
1/2 bunch fresh parsley
1/2 bunch fresh mint
1 tablespoon toasted pine nuts + extra for serving
juice from 1 lemon
grated zest from 1 lemon
pinch of red chili flakes
1/2 cup Olive oil
4 eggs
vinegar

  • Preheat oven to 380F.
  • Place the bread, asparagus and ramps on a baking tray and drizzle with oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.
  • Bake until golden, about 12 minutes.
  • Place herbs, pine nuts, lemon, chili and oil in a blender and blend until smooth. If its to thick just add a little more oil.
  • Bring a pot of water to the boil and add a little vinegar, poach the eggs for 3 minutes.
  • In a bowl start with the bread, then asparagus and ramps, then the egg, pine nuts and finish off with the lemon herb sauce.

Buy Ramps Here

RAMP ESCABECHE

Ingredients

8 oz. ramps, trimmed
12 cup plus 2 Tbsp. olive oil
Kosher salt
34 cup rice vinegar
14 cup honey
Coarsely ground black pepper

Instructions

Light a grill. In a large bowl, toss the ramps with 2 tablespoons of the olive oil and season with salt. Arrange the ramps on the grill, and cook, turning, until lightly charred, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer the ramps to a glass pint jar, folding them to fit inside, if necessary.
In a 2-qt. saucepan, combine the vinegar with the honey and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until reduced by one-third, about 5 minutes. Pour the vinegar over the ramps along with the remaining 12 cup olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. Seal the jar and let stand until completely cool before serving. Refrigerate for up to 2 months.

BUY RAMPS HERE

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